Dowsing for tunnels

for matters relating to archaeological and historical dowsing.

Dowsing for tunnels

Postby griff » Sun Dec 31, 2006 12:50 pm

I have recently been asked to locate tunnels on a property adjacent to a slate quarry pit which has been filled-in for landfill, most of my work is prospecting for potable water borehole sources and I am unsure about dowsing for dry cavities. I understand that in the 19th century French dowsers were successful in mapping tunnels and cavities beneath Paris.

Can anyone suggest appropriate procedures in dowsing for such a project?.

Happy and prosperous New Year to all.

Regards. Griff.
griff
 
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Re: Seeking advice

Postby Geoff Stuttaford » Tue Jan 02, 2007 11:48 am

griff wrote:I have recently been asked to locate tunnels on a property adjacent to a slate quarry pit which has been filled-in for landfill, most of my work is prospecting for potable water borehole sources and I am unsure about dowsing for dry cavities. I understand that in the 19th century French dowsers were successful in mapping tunnels and cavities beneath Paris.

Can anyone suggest appropriate procedures in dowsing for such a project?. Griff.


Hi Griff,

You may like to try the following :

Off Site :

1. Get hold of a map or an aerial photo of the site to be investigated on the largest scale you can find.

2. Draw a grid of one inch squares on the map or the photo.

3. Dowse each horizontal or vertical line of squares to determine in which squares the tunnels lie. (use a pendulum) Tick the relevant aquares.

4. In the squares where there are tunnels, draw another grid of squares and repeat 3 above. This will give you a fairly accurate picture of where to start your site dowsing.

On Site :

1. Using an L-rod, ask that one side of any underground tunnel or cavern be revealed to you. Start walking where the L-rod leads you.

2. Leave markers every few yards and particularly when you diverge from a straight line.

3. Follow the line indicated by the rods back to your starting point. You should then have the plan of the tunnel or cavern defined on the surface of the ground.

4. You can then measure the dimensions of the ground plan and transfer them to your map or photo, using trigonometry if necesary

5. You can ask your rods to indicate any blocks in the tunnel by getting them to turn at right angles to your line of walk, but dont forget to search beyond any block as the tunnel may continue beyond the blocked point.

Having plotted the plan of the tunnel, you can now return to off site work and, if required, plot the cross section of the tunnel at any point by using a scaled grid, using a pendulum. The depth of the tunnels, the date of construction and the location of any flooding can also be determined by dowsing.

A similar method can, of course, be used for archaeological dowsing.

Hope this helps.

Geoff
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Geoff Stuttaford
 
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Postby griff » Thu Jan 04, 2007 5:53 pm

Hi Geoff

Thanks for the advice, I will visit the site again with 'L' rods when the wind is not blowing quite as hard as on my previous visit, when I was forced to use the old hazel twig.

Will keep you posted on results.

Regards, Griff.
griff
 
Posts: 175
Joined: Sat Jun 10, 2006 12:04 pm
Location: South Pool Kingsbridge Devon UK


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